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Causes of a Houma Head-On Collision

As defined by Houma law, a head-on collision usually occurs on a two-lane roadway where one party is passing in a no-passing zone or is passing in a careless manner and comes into the lane of the party who is injured, creating a head-on collision. Someone crosses out of their lane into the other lane where a driver is lawfully operating a vehicle. Other head-on collisions, such as T-bone accidents, may occur in intersectional collisions. If you have been injured in a bumper to bumper collision, speak with an experienced car accident attorney right away. A lawyer can help you seek the compensation you deserve by helping you consider the impact of potential causes of a Houma head-on collision.

Common Collision Scenarios

Head-on collisions often occur on two-lane highways where vehicles are passing in no-passing zones or they are passing in an unsafe manner and end up in the opposite lane late at night. Drivers impaired by alcohol, illegal narcotics, or excessive prescription medication may drift into the lane of the other party. Sometimes, people driving on curved roadways cut the curve short and end up in a lane of another vehicle, causing a crash.

From time to time head-on collisions occur on five-lane roadways with a turning lane in the middle for left-turning motorists. When traffic is congested, drivers move into the left-turning lane who want to turn left and are looking for an opening in the traffic. They do not recognize that there is another vehicle in the left turn lane coming from the opposite direction, doing the same thing.

What Are Associated Head-On Injuries?

Houma head-on collision lawyers know that these accidents can cause broken bones, fractured legs, broken hips, brain injuries, lacerations, and intrusion of the vehicle into the passenger compartment. The forces involved in these head-on collisions can result in vehicles overturning with serious brain injuries and death.

Common Causes of Head-On Collisions

Head-on collisions usually come about when one driver is operating a motor vehicle in a careless, negligent, or reckless manner. Some common causes of a Houma head-on collision include the following:

  • Crossing a double line
  • Drunk driving or DUI’s
  • Disobeying stop signs, yield signs, and other roadway signs, such as ‘Do Not Enter,’ ‘No Entry,’ or ‘No Access’ signs
  • Disobeying or disregarding traffic control devices, including traffic lights and railroad crossing signs
  • Crossing a median on a dual-lane highway or roadway
  • Speeding and swerving – especially on multi-lane roadways
  • Vehicle overhang on roadways
  • Driver fatigue or falling asleep at the wheel
  • Failing to observe lane markings
  • Negligent passing or abrupt lane changes
  • Failing to make proper use of a turn signal

Accident Investigation Process

When causes of a Houma head-on collision are investigated by Houma Police Department, State Police, or the Terrebonne Parish Sheriff’s Office, the attorney can obtain the crash report to review the findings of the investigating officer. A lawyer can obtain photographs the investigating officer acquired. An attorney may take photographs of the crash scene if they are retained early on.

What Information Does an Attorney Typically Pursue?

When there is an impact, there typically is a gouge mark in the highway. Photographs can document the point of impact. Lawyers can retain an accident reconstruction expert such as a trained state trooper or an engineer who can speak to the common causes of a Houma head-on collision. They gather the evidence by looking at the vehicles that crashed, the photographs of the scene, and going to the scene itself. The accident reconstruction expert can give their opinion on where and how the crash occurred.

Another source of information is the data from the black boxes found in most vehicles on the road. The data comes from the airbags and from the brakes. There are computers on modern vehicles that tell the path of the vehicle, the speed of the vehicle, and whether the brakes were applied. Commercial vehicles often have digital devices in the cab that are connected with the dispatcher’s office at the trucking company. An officer or accident reconstruction expert can use this information to prove how the crash occurred.